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G20 Police Riot Revisited



I believe that it was Dr. Dawg on the Rev’s Maple Syrup Revolution that first used the term Police Riot to describe what took place at the Toronto G20. If not the person who originally came up with the definition, at least the first that I heard use the term, that best describes what happened on Saturday afternoon and all day Sunday, in Toronto, that weekend.

What originated on Wednesday as small groups of specialty protestors, such as Transexuals for Fair Housing, marching down the street surrounded by friendly, somewhat humorously dressed, bicycled, police officers, surrounding and outnumbering protestors about two to one, slowly grew throughout the G20 week towards the 20,000 official G20 march on Saturday morning and all was peaceful as important points and positions were trying to be made.

At least until the seventy or so, black hooded, police infiltrated, anarchists broke off at the end of the march, and started spray painting walls, smashing windows and infamously setting, planted, abandoned, soon to be replaced and or recycled police cars on fire, which of course then produced the money shot for the media and the G20 security planners.

It is amazing what a billion dollars of security resources, undercover deployment and long term planning can buy in order to manipulate the messaging at a G20 conference.

So the world and the majority of Canadians, then believed that the Toronto G20 was another typical, lefty, anti everything protest event that turned into another juvenile, anarchistic display of broken windows and all would go as planned for those who plan such things, except for the fact that for the rest of weekend, the police rioted.

We witnessed on TV and now through more private video and personal testimony the extent of the harassment, brutality, and abuse, including sexual abuse, that was wrought upon law abiding Canadian citizens by a large number of Toronto police officers throughout Saturday & Sunday,

A Police Riot best describes what happened at the Toronto G20.

In any case here is ffibs interpretation of that weekend.

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