Monday, June 2, 2008

David Frum 'must have suffered terrible anxiety'

Apparently not yet

This quote from his Post article is just Frum continuing his schilling for the Neocon cause. He must be on a retainer. According to Frum's version Scott McClellan was a poor choice for Press Secretary, and obviously couldn't handle the pressure, resulting in a breakdown and I guess, a tell-all book. 

Although the main purpose of the article is to discredit McClelland, Frum has gone to a great deal of effort to appear critical of the Bush administration. However his examples Miers, Gonzalez, Hughes, Hawkins, and Card, have already been forced out. He does take a shot at Rice, though. But as for Bush himself, Frum's main criticism is the man's management style.

The gist of his piece is that all the destruction caused, billions wasted and 100's of thousands of lives lost was due to the fact that Bush was a poor manager, basically choosing the wrong people to delegate to. 

The last seven and a half years had nothing to do with the actual plans put forth, assistance provided or profits gained by Frum's Neocons, from the PNAC (Cheney, Kristol, Pearle, Rumsfeld, Wolfowitz etc.). In his criticisms of Bush, Frum sounds more like a disgruntled board member that is disappointed with the implementation skills of the CEO that they hired, than a speech writer who worked for Bush.

Although this is one of the most strangely structured articles that I have read from Frum, (he is a skilled writer), there appears to be one, well crafted paragraph that stands out and attempts to provide some administrative cover or story line development for the CIA leak regarding the outing of Plame.
For three years, Bush left Scott McClellan in a position for which he was unsuited and in which he must have suffered terrible anxiety and stress. Finally, McClellan was deputed to act as the administration’s shield and buffer in the Valerie Plame leak case. The administration had nothing to fear from the truth, but McClellan was assigned to say things that later proved untrue. Understandably, he feels terrible bitterness about the episode — and predictably, a book publisher offered him the opportunity to exact his revenge.
I think it is "the nothing to fear" part that might still be in question. In the end after all the harm that this administration has caused to both the world at large and within the US itself, it would seem almost Capone like to be able to nail them on just the outing of a CIA agent. Maybe they just don't have all their tracks covered on this one yet.

And that is probably the only anxiety that Frum is suffering from.

3 comments:

The Mound of Sound said...

Frum and the neo-con cabal are navigating dangerous waters. They pushed for and got the war they wanted, the conquest of Iraq, but it didn't turn out to conform to their delusions so they have to duck any responsibility. So, like John McSame, they contend that the war was right and proper, it was just poorly executed. They've already staged their own "withdrawal with honour" and made damned sure nobody else will get such noble treatment.
Barbara must be very proud of the jumped up creature she spawned.

sassy said...

Barbara must be very proud of the jumped up creature she spawned.

I think Barbara Frum would spin in her grave is she knew what her little boy was up to.

sassy said...

if she knew, not is she knew :(