Tuesday, June 24, 2008

New ad campaign announced: What’s good for the Tar Sands is good for Canada

The Globe and Mail reports today that CAPP (the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers) are about to launch a new ad campaign to better inform Canadians about the tar sands projects.

From the article the key messages are:

Apparently “the oil sands is a national project, similar in scope to the building of the railway in the 19th century.”

Even though it is the fastest growing source of greenhouse gases, the tar sands only represent 4% right now.

And over the next decade they are going to start using new technologies, like the carbon capture and storage technology. As soon as someone can figure out how to apply it on such a large scale.

“Besides the oil sands are needed to meet the needs of the improving living standards in the developing world.”

The main theme of the campaign appears to be that Canadians should be proud of the contribution that our tar sands are making to the ever expanding consumption of fossil fuels.

I hate to be negative here, but this sounds like a very hard one to sell for the petroleum producers.

Maybe they should bring that cute little conservative oil splotch, out of retirement or hire some politicians to start backing the projects.

Oh I forgot, they already them.


See the Globe article here.

2 comments:

Mark Francis said...

I doubt CSS will be ready to do anything substantial in a long time.

That being said, the Tax shift proposal would give the tar sands $$$ to help pay for any technology which would offset carbon release.

Our current economic model is leaving a big mess for future generations to pay. This amounts to the future subsidizing the present. It's time those causing the problem did more about it.

Beijing York said...

“Besides the oil sands are needed to meet the needs of the improving living standards in the developing world.”

What the hell does that mean?

Sounds like the same double speak used by the World Bank and IMF to promote further monopolization by multinationals.